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Medal of Saint Benedict

 

 

 

The Medal or Cross of Saint Benedict
Medals, crosses, rosaries, statues, paintings and other religious articles have long been used as a means of fostering and expressing our religious devotion to God and the saints.
Icons, or painted images of Christ and the saints, are especially popular These sacramentals may be used as an aid to Christian piety and devotion.

The use of any religious article is therefore intended
as a means of reminding us of God and of stirring up in us
a ready willingness and desire to serve God and our neighbor.
With this understanding we reject any use of religious articles
as if they were mere charms or had some magic power
to bring us good luck or better health.
Such is not the Christian attitude. For the early Christians, the cross was a favorite symbol and badge
of their faith in Christ. From the writings of St. Gregory the Great (540-604), we know that St. Benedict had a deep faith in the Cross and worked miracles with the sign of the cross.
This faith in, and special devotion to, the Cross was passed on
to succeeding generations of Benedictines.

The origin of the Medal probably dates back to the time of St. Benedict himself, of whom we know that, in his frequent combats with the evil spirit, he generally made use of the Sign of the Cross
and wrought many miracles thereby.
He also taught his disciples to use the Sign of our redemption
against the assaults of Satan and in other dangers.
St. Maurus and St. Placidus, his first and most renowned disciples,
wrought their numerous miracles through the power of the holy Cross and in the name and by the merits of their holy Founder.

 

 

 

 The Jubilee Medal of Montecassino
The above features were finally incorporated in a newly designed medal struck in 1880 under the supervision of the monks of Montecassino, Italy, to mark the 1400th anniversary of the birth of St. Benedict.
The design of this medal was produced at St. Martin's Archabbey, Beuron, Germany, at the request of the prior of Montecassino,
Very Rev. Boniface Krug OSB (1838-1909).
Prior Boniface was a native of Baltimore and originally a monk
of St. Vincent Archabbey, Latrobe, Pennsylvania,
until he was chosen to become prior and latter archabbot of Montecassino.

Since that time, the Jubilee Medal of 1880
has proven to be more popular throughout the Christian world
than any other medal ever struck to honor St. Benedict.

Because the Jubilee Medal of 1880 has all the important features
ever associated with the Medal of St. Benedict,
the following description of this medal can serve to make clear
the nature and intent of any medal of St. Benedict,
no matter what shape or design it may legitimately have.

 

 

On the face of the medal is the image of Saint Benedict. In his right hand he holds the cross, the Christian's symbol of salvation. The cross reminds us of the zealous work of evangelizing and civilizing England and Europe carried out mainly by the Benedictine monks and nuns, especially for the sixth to the ninth/tenth centuries.

In St. Benedict's left hand is his Rule for Monasteries that could well be summed up in the words of the Prolog exhorting us to "walk in God's ways, with the Gospel as our guide."

On a pedestal to the right of St. Benedict is the poisoned cup, shattered when he made the sign of the cross over it. On a pedestal to the left is a raven about to carry away a loaf of poisoned bread that a jealous enemy had sent to St. Benedict.

C. S. P. B.
Above the cup and the raven are the Latin words: Crux s. patris Benedicti (The Cross of our holy father Benedict). On the margin of the medal, encircling the figure of Benedict, are the Latin words: Eius in obitu nostro praesentia muniamur! (May we be strengthened by his presence in the hour of our death!). Benedictines have always regarded St. Benedict as a special patron of a happy death. He himself died in the chapel at Montecassino while standing with his arms raised up to heaven, supported by the brothers of the monastery, shortly after St. Benedict had received Holy Communion

Below Benedict we read: ex SM Casino MDCCCLXXX (from holy Monte Cassino, 1880). This is the medal struck to commemorate the 1400th anniversary of the birth of Saint Benedict.

 

 

Reverse Side of the Medal
Crux mihi lux
On the back of the medal, the cross is dominant. On the arms of the cross are the initial letters of a rhythmic Latin prayer:

Crux sacra sit mihi lux! Nunquam draco sit mihi dux! (May the holy cross be my light! May the dragon never be my guide!).

In the angles of the cross, the letters C S P B stand for Crux Sancti Patris Benedicti (The cross of our holy father Benedict).

Above the cross is the word pax (peace), that has been a Benedictine motto for centuries. Around the margin of the back of the medal, the letters V R S N S M V - S M Q L I V B are the initial letters, as mentioned above, of a Latin prayer of exorcism against Satan: Vade retro Satana! Nunquam suade mihi vana! Sunt mala quae libas. Ipse venena bibas! (Begone Satan! Never tempt me with your vanities! What you offer me is evil. Drink the poison yourself!)

 

 

There is no special way prescribed for carrying or wearing
the Medal of St. Benedict. It can be worn on a chain around the neck, attached to one's rosary, kept in one's pocket or purse, or placed in one's car or home.
The medal is often put into the foundations of houses and building,
on the walls of barns and sheds, or in one's place of business.

The purpose of using the medal in any of the above ways
is to call down God's blessing and protection upon us, wherever we are, and upon our homes and possessions,
especially through the intercession of St. Benedict.
By the conscious and devout use of the medal, it becomes, as it were, a constant silent prayer and reminder to us of our dignity
as followers of Christ.

The medal is a prayer of exorcism against Satan,
a prayer for strength in time of temptation, a prayer for peace
among ourselves and among the nations of the world,
a prayer that the Cross of Christ be our light and guide,
a prayer of firm rejection of all that is evil, a prayer of petition that we may with Christian courage "walk in God's ways, with the Gospel as our guide," as St. Benedict urges us.

The Medal of St. Benedict can serve as a constant reminder
of the need for us to take up our cross daily
and "follow the true King, Christ our Lord,"
and thus learn "to share in his heavenly kingdom,"
as St. Benedict urges us in the Prolog of his Rule.

 Two Special Uses of the Medal
By a rescript of the Sacred Congregation of Religious (4 May 1965)
lay Oblates of St. Benedict are permitted to wear the Medal of St. Benedict instead of the small black cloth scapular formerly worn.

By a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Rites (6 March 1959),
the Blessing of St. Maurus  over the sick is permitted to be given with a Medal of St. Benedict instead of with a relic of the True Cross,
since the latter is difficult to obtain.

Blessing of Saint Maurus offsite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Medal or Cross of Saint Benedict
Medals, crosses, rosaries, statues, paintings and other religious articles have long been used as a means of fostering and expressing our religious devotion to God and the saints.
Icons, or painted images of Christ and the saints, are especially popular These sacramentals may be used as an aid to Christian piety and devotion.

The use of any religious article is therefore intended
as a means of reminding us of God and of stirring up in us
a ready willingness and desire to serve God and our neighbor.
With this understanding we reject any use of religious articles
as if they were mere charms or had some magic power
to bring us good luck or better health.
Such is not the Christian attitude. For the early Christians, the cross was a favorite symbol and badge
of their faith in Christ. From the writings of St. Gregory the Great (540-604), we know that St. Benedict had a deep faith in the Cross and worked miracles with the sign of the cross.
This faith in, and special devotion to, the Cross was passed on
to succeeding generations of Benedictines.

The origin of the Medal probably dates back to the time of St. Benedict himself, of whom we know that, in his frequent combats with the evil spirit, he generally made use of the Sign of the Cross
and wrought many miracles thereby.
He also taught his disciples to use the Sign of our redemption
against the assaults of Satan and in other dangers.
St. Maurus and St. Placidus, his first and most renowned disciples,
wrought their numerous miracles through the power of the holy Cross and in the name and by the merits of their holy Founder.

 

 

 

 The Jubilee Medal of Montecassino
The above features were finally incorporated in a newly designed medal struck in 1880 under the supervision of the monks of Montecassino, Italy, to mark the 1400th anniversary of the birth of St. Benedict.
The design of this medal was produced at St. Martin's Archabbey, Beuron, Germany, at the request of the prior of Montecassino,
Very Rev. Boniface Krug OSB (1838-1909).
Prior Boniface was a native of Baltimore and originally a monk
of St. Vincent Archabbey, Latrobe, Pennsylvania,
until he was chosen to become prior and latter archabbot of Montecassino.

Since that time, the Jubilee Medal of 1880
has proven to be more popular throughout the Christian world
than any other medal ever struck to honor St. Benedict.

Because the Jubilee Medal of 1880 has all the important features
ever associated with the Medal of St. Benedict,
the following description of this medal can serve to make clear
the nature and intent of any medal of St. Benedict,
no matter what shape or design it may legitimately have.

 

 

On the face of the medal is the image of Saint Benedict. In his right hand he holds the cross, the Christian's symbol of salvation. The cross reminds us of the zealous work of evangelizing and civilizing England and Europe carried out mainly by the Benedictine monks and nuns, especially for the sixth to the ninth/tenth centuries.

In St. Benedict's left hand is his Rule for Monasteries that could well be summed up in the words of the Prolog exhorting us to "walk in God's ways, with the Gospel as our guide."

On a pedestal to the right of St. Benedict is the poisoned cup, shattered when he made the sign of the cross over it. On a pedestal to the left is a raven about to carry away a loaf of poisoned bread that a jealous enemy had sent to St. Benedict.

C. S. P. B.
Above the cup and the raven are the Latin words: Crux s. patris Benedicti (The Cross of our holy father Benedict). On the margin of the medal, encircling the figure of Benedict, are the Latin words: Eius in obitu nostro praesentia muniamur! (May we be strengthened by his presence in the hour of our death!). Benedictines have always regarded St. Benedict as a special patron of a happy death. He himself died in the chapel at Montecassino while standing with his arms raised up to heaven, supported by the brothers of the monastery, shortly after St. Benedict had received Holy Communion

Below Benedict we read: ex SM Casino MDCCCLXXX (from holy Monte Cassino, 1880). This is the medal struck to commemorate the 1400th anniversary of the birth of Saint Benedict.

 

 

Reverse Side of the Medal
Crux mihi lux
On the back of the medal, the cross is dominant. On the arms of the cross are the initial letters of a rhythmic Latin prayer:

Crux sacra sit mihi lux! Nunquam draco sit mihi dux! (May the holy cross be my light! May the dragon never be my guide!).

In the angles of the cross, the letters C S P B stand for Crux Sancti Patris Benedicti (The cross of our holy father Benedict).

Above the cross is the word pax (peace), that has been a Benedictine motto for centuries. Around the margin of the back of the medal, the letters V R S N S M V - S M Q L I V B are the initial letters, as mentioned above, of a Latin prayer of exorcism against Satan: Vade retro Satana! Nunquam suade mihi vana! Sunt mala quae libas. Ipse venena bibas! (Begone Satan! Never tempt me with your vanities! What you offer me is evil. Drink the poison yourself!)

 

 

There is no special way prescribed for carrying or wearing
the Medal of St. Benedict. It can be worn on a chain around the neck, attached to one's rosary, kept in one's pocket or purse, or placed in one's car or home.
The medal is often put into the foundations of houses and building,
on the walls of barns and sheds, or in one's place of business.

The purpose of using the medal in any of the above ways
is to call down God's blessing and protection upon us, wherever we are, and upon our homes and possessions,
especially through the intercession of St. Benedict.
By the conscious and devout use of the medal, it becomes, as it were, a constant silent prayer and reminder to us of our dignity
as followers of Christ.

The medal is a prayer of exorcism against Satan,
a prayer for strength in time of temptation, a prayer for peace
among ourselves and among the nations of the world,
a prayer that the Cross of Christ be our light and guide,
a prayer of firm rejection of all that is evil, a prayer of petition that we may with Christian courage "walk in God's ways, with the Gospel as our guide," as St. Benedict urges us.

The Medal of St. Benedict can serve as a constant reminder
of the need for us to take up our cross daily
and "follow the true King, Christ our Lord,"
and thus learn "to share in his heavenly kingdom,"
as St. Benedict urges us in the Prolog of his Rule.

 Two Special Uses of the Medal
By a rescript of the Sacred Congregation of Religious (4 May 1965)
lay Oblates of St. Benedict are permitted to wear the Medal of St. Benedict instead of the small black cloth scapular formerly worn.

By a decree of the Sacred Congregation of Rites (6 March 1959),
the Blessing of St. Maurus  over the sick is permitted to be given with a Medal of St. Benedict instead of with a relic of the True Cross,
since the latter is difficult to obtain.

Blessing of Saint Maurus offsite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                    Feastday July 11 - Patron against poisoning and attacks of the devil

     Glorious St. Benedict, sublime model of virtue, pure vessel of God's grace!
Behold me humbly kneeling at your feet.
I implore you in your loving kindness
to pray for me before the throne of God.
To you I have recourse in the dangers
that daily surround me. Shield me against my selfishness and my indifference to God and to my neighbor. Inspire me to imitate you in all things. May your blessing be with me always, so that I may see and serve Christ
in others and work for His kingdom.

   Graciously obtain for me from God
those favors and graces which I need so much in the trials, miseries, and afflictions of life. Your heart was always full of love,
compassion, and mercy toward those
who were afflicted or troubled in any way.
You never dismissed without consolation
and assistance anyone who has recourse to you. I invoke your powerful intercession,
confident in the hope that you will hear
my prayers and obtain for me the special grace and favor I earnestly implore.

(mention your favor)

   Help me, great St. Benedict,
to live and die as a faithful child of God,
to run in the sweetness of His loving will,
and to attain the eternal happiness
of heaven.
Amen.
 

NOVENA TO SAINT BENEDICT

 

Glorious St. Benedict who taught us the way to religious perfection by the practice of self-conquest, mortification, humility, obedience,
prayer, silence, retirement and detachment from the world, I kneel at your feet and humbly beg you to take my present need
under your special protection
(mention here).
Vouchsafe to recommend it to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and lay it before the throne of Jesus. Cease not to intercede for me
until my request is granted. Above all, obtain for me the grace to one day meet God face to face, and with you and Mary and all the angels and saints to praise Him through all eternity. O most powerful Saint Benedict,
do not let me lose my soul, but obtain for me the grace of winning my way to heaven,
there to worship and enjoy the most holy and adorable Trinity forever and ever.
Amen.

Pray Our Father,

Hail Mary,

and Glory Be.